Legislative Purpose

  • Gypsy moth caterpiller, Lymantria dispar
    Gypsy moth caterpiller is a serious pest to oak and aspen trees in Minnesota.

The Minnesota Invasive Terrestrial Plants and Pests Center was established by the Minnesota Legislature under ML 2014, Ch. 312, Art. 13, Sec. 44.
INVASIVE TERRESTRIAL PLANTS AND PESTS CENTER
Subdivision 1. Establishment. The Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota is requested to establish an Invasive Terrestrial Plants and Pests Center to prevent and minimize the threats posed by terrestrial invasive plants, other weeds, pathogens, and pests in order to protect the state's prairies, forests, wetlands, and agricultural resources. With the approval of the board, the College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Science, in coordination with the College of Biological Sciences, shall administer the center utilizing the following departments:
(1) Entomology;
(2) Plant Pathology;
(3) Forest Resources;
(4) Horticultural Science;
(5) Fisheries Wildlife and Conservation Biology;
(6) Agronomy and Plant Genetics;
(7) Plant Biology; and
(8) Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior.

The college may also utilize the following research and outreach centers in achieving the purposes of this section: Cloquet Forestry Center; North Central Research and Outreach Center; Northwest Research and Outreach Center; Southern Research and Outreach Center; Southwest Research and Outreach Center; West Central Research and Outreach Center; Rosemount Research and Outreach Center; Horticultural Research Center; and Sand Plain Research Center.

Subd. 2. Purpose. The purpose of the Invasive Terrestrial Plants and Pests Center is to research and develop effective measures to prevent and minimize the threats posed by terrestrial invasive plants, pathogens, and pests, including agricultural weeds and pests, in order to protect the state's native prairies, forests, wetlands, and agricultural resources, by: (1) creating a prioritized list of pest and plant species that threaten the state's prairies, forests, wetlands, and agricultural resources and making the list publicly accessible; and (2) conducting research focused on the species included on the prioritized list developed under this subdivision that includes:
(i) development of new control methods, including biocontrols;
(ii) development of integrated pest management tools that minimize nontarget impacts;
(iii) research projects focused on establishment prevention, early detection, and rapid response;
(iv) an analysis of any consequences related to the management of prioritized species to the state's water, pollinators, and native prairies and other native species; and
(v) reports on the results that are made publicly accessible.

Subd. 3. Report. By January 15, 2015, as a condition of the appropriation provided under this act, the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota shall submit a report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the house of representatives and senate committees and divisions with jurisdiction over the environment and natural resources and agriculture on: (1) the activities and outcomes of the center; and (2) any recommendations for additional funding for education, implementation, or other activities.